Tag Archives: alice waters

Monday Links

Eater SF is soothed/not-soothed by Alice Waters.  Aren’t we all?

Ian McEwan is such an easy target!  And Quilty hits a bullseye.

On fulfillment by Rimpletide.

Nicolette Camille does really beautiful floral design.  And she takes great picures too.

nicolette

Bouquet by Nicolette Camille

Calas, geranium leaves, garden roses, tuberose and jasmine.  Brilliant.

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Announcement: What\’s Hot in Local Eating~Peko Peko!

I recently attended this fabulous event at 826 Valencia, moderated by the talented and beguiling Chris Ying.  How can you resist someone who dug up a mid-50\’s copy of James Beard\’s Cooking Fish and used it as his sole prop during a panel on the politics and science of food?

Each of the panelists talked about why we\’re interested in food and what about it interests us now.  If you, like these esteemed food journalists, are passionate about delicious morsels that meet Bonnie Azab Powell\’s critera for SOLE food (Sustainable, Organic, Local, Ethical) you\’ll LOVE Peko-Peko.  The mastermind behind the affair, Sylvan Mishima Brackett, cut his teeth as assistant to Alice Waters at Chez Panisse and editing The Slow Food Guide to San Francisco and the Bay Area.

This month, Peko-Peko  has created a Spring bento box available for delivery in the Bay Area.  

The bottom level of this two tier bento is filled with kanimeshi: fresh steamed Dungeness crab, seasoned California-grown Japanese rice, pickled ginger, and sansho pepper. The top layer includes three menchikatsu: Marin Sun pastured pork and onion cutlets and dashi maki tamago: rolled farm egg with fresh dashi. Made primarily with ingredients from around the Bay Area, it’s a taste of Tokyo by way of San Francisco. This bento serves 2-3 people and is $65.

Deliveries will be made every Wednesday in March. Orders must be placed by the Monday prior to delivery.

We had their osechi bento for New Year\’s and it soothed hard.  In other words, open a bento box and say hello to Soothistan!   


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Japanese New Year with Peko-Peko

My father has a fascination with Japan that is ongoing.  When I was around the age of six it was at a peak.  He would take me to Little Tokyo in L.A. to buy obscene amounts of origami paper and instruction books.  Then we would eat a Japanese lunch and drive back to Hollywood.  I was a very accomplished origamist and quickly became a little Japanophile myself.  I read Sadako and the 1,000 Paper Cranes, mourned Hiroshima, and eagerly awaited my father’s return from trips to Japan with his arms full of Japanese silks and Geisha dolls.

geisha

During those years my father would take me and my family to his Japanese friends’ homes in Los Angeles for Japanese New Year, celebrated on January 1.  The Japanese New Year feast is composed of foods referred to as osechi.  My father would tell me that if I ate everything and was very polite and respectful that he would take me with him on one of his trips to Japan.  I was not a fearful eater and ate many different types of foods from a young age, but swallowing some of the more foreign elements of osechi (bitter orange or bitter melon, roes of various sorts) was a feat even for me.  

Years went by, and my father continued to travel to Japan from time to time, but tickets were expensive, my prep school schedule was demanding, and despite all my good eating of osechi, the trip to Japan never materialized.  

Two years ago I went to Belize and got engaged.  The engagement was long coming, and we weren’t going to wait.  The marriage would take place within six months.

When I got back to the Bay Area my parents were there waiting to greet my new fiance and me.  My father greeted me with two business class tickets to Tokyo for him and me.  It was August, so no Japanese New Year in Japan, but it would do.  

This year my husband and I are celebrating Japanese New Year with Peko-Peko, the fledging catering company from Chez Panisse alum Sylvan Mishima Brackett.  Our bento will include Crab Namasu: Vinegared daikon and carrot with steamed Dungeness crab, Misozuke Beef Tataki: Miso-cured grassfed tenderloin, Datemaki: Sweet rolled omelet with Riverdog Farm eggs and local rockcod for wisdom in the New Year, Yuzu Pickled Turnips, Kuromame: Sweetened black soybeans for health in the New Year, Chikuzen-Ni: Local taro, carrot, potato, and shitake with lotus root and Mary’s organic chicken, Kombu-Maki: Sardines rolled Hokkaido kombu for happiness in the New Year, and Black Cod Teriyaki: Marinated and grilled Bolinas black cod.  

osechi-flier

We are lucky to have relished Brackett’s creations before (click here for that menu).  The fried eggplant was sweet and tender and the summer tomatoes offered the perfect clean refreshment.  My mouth is watering just imagining the flavors our oseshi bento will offer.

I’m hoping this beautiful gastronomic experience will set the tone for my eating for all of 2009.  And as if that weren’t enough, A Rockridge Life is desperate to see Peko-Peko expand: how about a storefront on College Avenue?  Pretty please?  

kotoshi mo yoroshiku o-negai-shimasu (今年もよろしくお願いします) 

I hope for your favour again in the coming year

Click here for more information on Brackett and Peko-Peko.

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Live Thanksgiving Cooking Blog

I just found this on the NY Times.  There are probably few of you with your hands free enough to read it, but I do.  I’m actually living vicariously through it.  Saddleshoos has something of a talent in the kitchen, and a love of the process of preparing a meal.  Sadly, both of the two Thanksgiving dinners Saddleshoos is attending this year (at 2PM PST and 5PM PST respectively) will be catered rather than cooked by people I know and love with participation (for better or worse) of various blood and non-blood relatives.

Here is a funny excerpt from the blog featuring a Bay Area celeb:

Waters in the Weeds | 1:18 p.m. OK, so just so no one feels alone, Miss Alice Waters herself just called. Thanksgiving at her house is in the weeds a bit, too. She was looking for one of my guests, the chef Scott Peacock, who has yet to arrive. (And really, it’s not like my daily life is all fancy and chef-y. It’s just that I have a job that involves talking to these people. And since we are all interested in food, we tend to find each other on food holidays.)

Anyway, she had a cornbread crisis of some kind and wanted to talk with Scott, who is up in Central Park reading a poem at a pilgrim monument or something. He should be here soon.

Alice also reports that there was a granita incident involving her daughter, and that she forgot she had put the stuffing on an antique 1920s tray and then accidentally put it in a warm oven to dry.

She now has a ruined tray and a stuffing emergency.

So how is your Thanksgiving cooking going so far? Send in all near misses and disasters.

Oh, sugar. I forgot to put the turkeys in the oven. Gotta go.

Pretty good right?  I’m off to a liquid lunch if you know what I mean…

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